Filtering by: 2019

“A Land with No Name” :  Sara Madandar
Oct
5
to Oct 26

“A Land with No Name” : Sara Madandar

  • Co-Lab Projects @ Springdale General (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
Web image .jpg

A Land with No Name
Sara Madandar
October 5th-26th, 2019

Soft Closing: Saturday, October 26th, 5-7PM @ The Front Page (the bar next door to the gallery)
Open Hours: Tuesday-Saturday, 12-6pm

A Land with No Name is a series that takes its inspiration from Persian history–in particular, how complex notions of gender and national identity changed in Iran between the 19th and 20th centuries. Afsaneh Najmabadi’s book Women with Mustaches and Men without Beards explores how, during the 19th centuries Qajar dynasty, Iran’s national identity was ambiguously gendered. This was a time in which women with mustaches were considered attractive and the emblem on the nation’s flag was a female lion. As the nation “modernized” into the 20th century, many of its symbols of national identity transitioned to more masculine forms–even the flag’s lioness was changed to a lion.

Exploring these historical transitions, A Land with No Name uses paintings to break down and reconfigure how we think of place, nation, identity, and gender. In this series, these transformations are represented by breaking down the canvas. In some paintings it is shredded and cut, in others burned and etched with a laser cutter. The destruction and remaking of materials have long been a key component of my artistic practice. The hand-made paper in this series is recycled from 2017 editions of the New York Times featuring headlines about Trump’s “Muslim ban.” Literally dissolving the news through this papermaking process reflects our current political reality—each new day brings dramatic news, however, the impact of these profound political events is quickly forgotten, making way for the next wave of increasingly shocking news.

Having moved from Iran to Texas for graduate school then again to New Orleans, my life has been one of major cultural transitions. Navigating through these cultures has caused me to reflect on the identity of place and ask how do we define a land? What do its borders mean? How do we change as we migrate across them? Recent geopolitical events have had a direct effect on my ability to move between cultures and has caused me to consider these questions. For instance—due to the Trump administration’s “Muslim ban” and withdrawal from the Iran nuclear deal my family is no longer able to visit me. From within this turmoil of these questions and circumstances I started imagining a free land, one with no names, borders, or flags. The land I imagine takes the shape of a woman’s body, my body, becoming my homeland. I imagined myself saying "I am from my own body, it is A Land with No Name.”

Sara Madandar is an Iranian multi-disciplinary artist based in the United States. She received her MFA from the University of Texas at Austin and her BA in painting from the Azad University of Art and Architecture in Tehran. Through a range of media such as painting, video, installation, and performance—Madandar explores migration and the human experience of living in between cultures. Her work uses the aesthetics of language, clothing, and bodies to study the complexities of cross-cultural experiences from a unique perspective. Madandar’s most recent accolades include an award from the Texas Visual Artists Association (TVAA) and an award from the Southeastern College Art Conference (SECAC) for an exhibition curated by Jessica Beck of the Andy Warhol museum. Sara’s work has been featured at Co-Lab Projects, Elga Wimmer PCC, New Orleans Museum of Art, Austin City Hall, New Orleans Contemporary Art Center, Elisabeth Ney Museum, Mom Gallery, Courtyard Gallery, and the Asian American Resource Center.

View Event →
"That’s not going anywhere." : Dave Culpepper
Sep
7
to Sep 28

"That’s not going anywhere." : Dave Culpepper

  • Co-Lab Projects @ Springdale General (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
thats not going anywhere.jpg

That’s not going anywhere.
Dave Culpepper
September 7th - 28th, 2019

A maquette is a tool used for siting where an object will eventually be installed. It is a simplified version of what it is representing, commonly made very cheaply. Maquettes are usually constructed at full scale in order to show how the final object will relate with its surroundings. They are a tool that allows you to see what potential an object has without putting the object at risk. Maquettes serve a purpose and then are abandoned/become useless after their job is finished.

Models are often made to a scale that is much smaller than actual size. Models can be used for planning spaces, creating object relationships, and studying different viewpoints. Models are like maquettes, in that they represent objects, except they need to maintain relevant aspects or important details of the original. Models are used over and again, waiting to be a vessel for ideas.

Scale is a mechanism used to help orient objects in a space. It is also used to help simplify too large of spaces, ideas, or systems (railroads, solar system, city planning). All of these are tools to help realize a concept. Most of the time they are used in conjunction with one another. These three tools help with efficiency with spatial planning.

David Culpepper was born in Alexandria, Virginia. In 2010 he received a BFA in Painting and Printmaking from Virginia Commonwealth University. David has been living in Austin for the last 9 years and is a founding member of Ink Tank Collective, Free Beer Podcast, and Fancy Fancy Studios and Gallery. His most recent projects have been exhibited at Grayduck Gallery, MASS Gallery, and Pump Project. David received the Austin Critics Table Award for his solo exhibition Wake Me When It's Quittin' Time at Co-Lab Projects in 2014-2015.

View Event →
"Highs and Lo-Fi's" : Adrian Armstrong
Aug
3
to Aug 31

"Highs and Lo-Fi's" : Adrian Armstrong

  • Co-Lab Projects @ Springdale General (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
IMG_7146.JPG

Highs and Lo-Fi's
Adrian Armstrong
August 3rd - 31st, 2019

We encourage visitors to bring an internet-capable device and headphones to listen to the musical components of the exhibition. Free Wi-Fi is available onsite.

Highs and Lo-Fi’s is a multisensory exhibition which explores the topic of mental health in African American culture. It is partly an exploration of Armstrong’s own personal struggles and a discussion about why mental health is often a taboo topic in the culture he was raised in. Many minorities suffer from depression in one form or another but it is often dismissed, ignored, or misdiagnosed. The show will focus specifically on mental health issues in the African American community with the intent of fostering an open and inclusive dialogue.

By pairing music and art, Armstrong aims to fully convey the highs and lows of mental health issues. Not only exploring what mental health issues such as depression are but also how they manifest in ones day to day life.

The show consists of a series of figurative paintings and drawings (including excerpts from the “We Can’t Breathe” series) depicting different scenarios and feelings associated with depression as experienced by Armstrong and other people who have engaged him in conversations about their personal experiences with mental health issues. Accompanying these paintings will also be an EP of self-produced songs created in tandem with the visual elements.

Adrian Armstrong is a creative from Omaha, NE now living and working out of Austin, TX. Armstrong received his BFA from the University of Nebraska - Lincoln in 2014. Through portrait and figurative practices, Armstrong’s work explores identity and what it means to be a black person living in modern America. His work touches on topics such as depression within the black community, systematic oppression, and police brutality; but on the other side of the spectrum explores fashion, love, success and growth.

View Event →
Permanent.Collection and Co-Lab Projects present: Sarah.Canright / Kaveri.Raina
Jul
6
to Jul 27

Permanent.Collection and Co-Lab Projects present: Sarah.Canright / Kaveri.Raina

  • Co-Lab Projects @ Springdale General (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
promo web.jpg

When life sends pictures you can’t digest quickly enough you
convert them to a cartoon mechanism so that the colors become
very hard and strong. Very clear so you can abide them. Think of
the work of Rainer Werner Fassbinder. Heavy shit. Same deal.
Always each image leans on the other held abreast by wefts and
warps so the shock of reality really gets caught. Held.
—Eileen Myles, Afterglow (a dog memoir) (2017)


Permanent.Collection and Co-Lab Projects present:
Sarah.Canright / Kaveri.Raina
July 6th - 27th, 2019

Opening Reception: July 6th, 7-11pm
Open Hours: Tuesday-Saturday 12-6pm

An ongoing exploration of self manifests in the paintings of Sarah.Canright and Kaveri.Raina. Here, portraiture in a shimmering space of fugitive color and light predominates. Employing techniques of abstraction, both artists are attentive to the memory of figurative forms, a landscape rooted in personal history, and a lifelong, almost-diaristic dedication to similar subject matter, including four-legged creatures, shadowy silhouettes, and irregular patterns.

The subjects of Sarah.Canright’s recent paintings hide, peek, layer, and weave appendages under and over one another. With direct line work, Canright’s oil paintings offer up a surface-level read of highly skilled realism, yet their pale subtlety in color and tone insist on another perspective, one seen through an abstract lens. Her oils evade accurate reproduction, in person offering an array of retina-confusing, vibrating color that seems to shimmer like a mirage under heat and light. In Canright’s watercolors, the figures are shaped by a bold, confident, and nuanced brush—bare-bones, essential information all conveyed by the most minimally painted mark, one that constrains but doesn’t bind. Light and color are captured within the lines like a bead of water: dependent and contained, yet able to scatter, disperse, and cascade at any moment.

Canright returns regularly to the portrait, often in profile, as the most reductive essence of her elegant subjects. These characters are emotionally expressive and full of life, folding themselves into the frame. Some also serve as a memento mori, a document of sickness and death created from photographs and memories of mourning. Somber, measured, haunting, and altogether loving, Canright’s use of companion iconography highlights an aspect of life that both tethers us and allows us to be free.

It’s hard not to deal with stark realism here in central Texas, faced with such intense heat, light, and humidity. The blue of sky, the white of the air, the red-brown earth. The staggering expanse of landscape, both lush and harsh. On most days there is a brilliant, fractal mirroring of light. To view Canright’s paintings is to become the light source, emitting and exuding an aura, an energy onto the canvas. A silhouette cast from white light, bleached out, like bones that have lived outside in the hot desert sand. And in all that light the image fades into the lost blink of memory.

In contrast, Kaveri.Raina’s paintings, often on the rough, utilitarian warp and weft of raw burlap, are punctuated by constrained glyphs and icons: bright color circumnavigated by a circling, obscuring haze of graphite. For Raina, a multiplicity of landscapes and identities collide to inform her work, from the frenetic urban sprawl of India’s capital city to the staid, wide plains of central Ohio. She regularly paints on both sides of the fabric, a scumbled thicket of pigment pushing from the back toward the surface, evoking a kind of suspension between two worlds. Raina’s subjects, translated and repeated until they are distilled and reduced in form, appear as shadowy silhouettes of indeterminate origin, blocked and blocking one another as they jockey for predominance on the surface.

Haunting, noir, these shadows tell a story. At one point a hat, perhaps an umbrella in the rain, two legs in a burlesque kick, a cow’s head, or maybe a dog running, a vase, a woman’s hair picked up by the wind. Here the light source seems to come from the background, from behind the silhouettes. A lantern cast from backstage, these shadow puppets dance behind the curtain, acting out a play we cannot hear. We are blocked, blinded, seeking out the outlines of an oncoming car through its high beams late at night on a small and winding rural road. Raina’s repetition of concentric circles could be the surrounding hazy glow from a bright light seen through rain—or perhaps her repeated marks cast a spell on the surrounding scene, a force field of energy unwinding the narrative, pulling characters together or holding them suspended, hovering, apart.

* * *

This exhibition is curated by Permanent.Collection and presented in collaboration with Co-Lab Projects. Text by Julia V. Hendrickson.

* * *

SARAH.CANRIGHT

Born = Chicago, Illinois (1941)

Raised = Chicago, Illinois & Winter Park, Florida

Lives = Austin, Texas

BFA = School of the Art Institute of Chicago (1964)

Work = Associate Professor of Practice, Studio Art (Painting & Drawing), The University of Texas at Austin (1982 – present)

See More = sarahcanright.com

KAVERI.RAINA

Born = New Delhi, India (1990)

Raised = New Delhi, India & Columbus, Ohio

Lives = Brooklyn, New York

BFA = Maryland Institute College of Art (2011)

MFA = School of the Art Institute of Chicago (2016)

See More = kaveriraina.com

* * *

Permanent.Collection is:

X.an archive of simultaneity.

X.an experimental exhibition space with a heart in Chicago, Illinois, a home in Austin, Texas, and a future in Los Angeles, California.

X.a curatorial project of Julia V. Hendrickson and Anthony B. Creeden.

More information at permanentcollectiongallery.com.


View Event →
"every day sugars" : Siera Hyte and Diamond Stingily
Jun
22
to Jul 13

"every day sugars" : Siera Hyte and Diamond Stingily

  • Co-Lab Projects @ Glissman Road (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
IMG_0727.jpeg

every day sugars
Siera Hyte and Diamond Stingily
June 22nd - July 12th, 2019

Partial Shade and Co-Lab Projects are pleased to present every day sugars, a multi-media exhibition by Siera Hyte and Diamond Stingily in response to A Platform with a reading during the opening reception programmed by August Huerta.

This project with Partial Shade will be Hyte and Stingily’s third exhibition working together. They will present a collaborative sound work, as well as printed matter, that draw on the dynamics of interpersonal relationships and ordinary actions.

Additionally, Hyte will present a new body of related work to be installed on and around the platform. August Huerta, an Austin-based poet, will organize a program of readings in conjunction with the exhibition’s opening night.

Diamond Stingily (b. 1990, Chicago) lives and works in New York. She has presented solo exhibitions at CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts, San Francisco; Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami; and a forthcoming exhibition at Kunstverein München, Munich. Group exhibitions include Schinkel Pavillon, Berlin and the surveys 2018 Triennial: Songs of Sabotage and Trigger: Gender As A Tool and a Weapon at the New Museum, New York.

Siera Hyte (b. 1990, Santa Ana) lives and works in Austin. She has presented solo exhibitions at Cordova, Barcelona; Musclebeach, Portland; Queer Thoughts, New York; and Egg, Chicago. Group exhibitions include Liste, Basel and Essex Street, New York, as well as a previous exhibition with Partial Shade, Austin. This fall, she has a forthcoming exhibition at Fresh Bread, Chicago.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

A Platform is a series of events and art installations organized by Partial Shade and Co-Lab Projects, centered around a physical platform built in an empty lot in East Austin. A Platform will provide a literal and conceptual space for emerging artists to share work and experiences and will provide artists and visitors an opportunity to experiment with new modes of relating to each other and their surroundings.

The structure for A Platform takes the form of a ramp gradually rising to a flat platform 2ft off the ground; this incline makes the platform more accessible to viewers and acts to undermine the established hierarchical relationship between performer and audience. This blurring of boundaries by an unusual, structural site from which to make and view art will encourage all involved to renegotiate their relationship with the physical and social space they are navigating.

PARTIAL SHADE is a nomadic curatorial project focused on organizing visual art exhibitions in non-traditional spaces, with work that is responsive to, considerate of, and affected by its environment. Untethered to one specific piece of real estate, Partial Shade operates as a model for a sustainable, alternative exhibition platform, and offers artists the opportunity to experiment with work that wouldn’t otherwise fit comfortably in a conventional gallery space. Partial Shade is organized by Rachael Starbuck, Michael Muelhaupt, and Jesse Cline. partialshade.info


This exhibition is sponsored in part by the Texas Commission on the Arts.

View Event →
"Ebony Reprinted" : Dana Robinson
Jun
1
to Jun 29

"Ebony Reprinted" : Dana Robinson

  • Co-Lab Projects @ Springdale General (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
Promo image web.jpg

Ebony Reprinted
Dana Robinson
June 1st - 29th, 2019
Open Hours: Tuesday-Saturday, 12-6pm

”My monoprints present the healing possibilities of abstraction. Using images that circulated in printed advertisements I remove traces of exploitative white dominated capitalist visual language allow the individuals in these images to regain their agency in the world. As the images are translated into paint, and that paint is intently smeared, pressed, and textured, the human beings at the center of these manipulative images become at once more abstract and exponentially more present.

The creation of the monoprints toes the line between careless fun and deep consideration. By reproducing the vintage Ebony magazine ads and editorial images in this way, I am constantly making rules just to break them in the next print. The visual results and the feelings they invoke are unpredictable and there is no reliable formula for their creation. As I oscillate between casual experimentation, and wanting strict control over this unruly process, I ultimately discover I am not interested in finding perfection and choose to maintain a sense of curiosity about the results.” - Dana Robinson

Dana Robinson was born in Brooklyn, grew up in Florida, and received a BFA in Design from Florida State University in 2012. Robinson is a multidisciplinary artist who combines, reproduces and deconstructs, vintage materials, found objects, and paint to address the topics of youth, black female identity, ownership and nostalgia. Robinson has exhibited her work in the US and abroad, most recently in No Place Like, a group show at Field Projects Gallery in NY, a solo show at 621 Gallery in Tallahassee, and The Art of Sharing show in the Saint-Paul de Mausole- Saint-Remy de Provence of France. Robinson’s work has been written about in VICE, Queen Mobs Teahouse, Kolaj Magazine, and Sarah Lawrence College’s Lumina Journal to name a few. Robinson is currently living in Brooklyn and pursuing her MFA in Fine Art at the School of Visual Arts.

View Event →
"Preludes" : Alicia Link and Stephanie Concepcion Ramirez
May
12
to May 31

"Preludes" : Alicia Link and Stephanie Concepcion Ramirez

  • Co-Lab Projects @ Glissman Road (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
preludes_image.jpg

Partial Shade and Co-Lab Projects present:
Preludes

Alicia Link and Stephanie Concepcion Ramirez
May 11th - May 31st, 2019

Partial Shade and Co-Lab Projects are pleased to present Preludes, a multi-media installation by Alicia Link and Stephanie Concepcion Ramirez in response to A Platform.

In their installation Preludes, Alicia Link and Stephanie Concepcion Ramirez imagine a place where their mothers meet for the first time. Fixed to Partial Shade’s Platform two “upholstered” pillars support a swath of material that will feature video(s) during designated viewing times. The screen doubles as a sail alluding to past histories of both women. Surrounding the platform woven scraps of fabric sparkle, sprawl, soften, and contrast the inherent flux of the landscape. Objects in the space serve as props and prompts presenting a give and take with the audience acting as a witness to this exchange. In mimicking the actions of their mothers, Link and Ramirez attempt to carefully understand the complexities of motherhood while carving a space for those nuances to take form. Preludes acknowledges the profound impact the artists’ mothers have on their work and examines how one of the most fundamental relationships can grow or wither with time.

ALICIA LINK was born in New Jersey in a suburb of Philadelphia. She earned a BFA in Painting from Boston University in 2012 and an MFA in Studio Art from The University of Texas at Austin in 2017. Link has exhibited her work in Boston, Austin, and Brooklyn. She’s been the recipient of a full fellowship to the Vermont Studio Center and a Capacity Building Award from the City of Austin Cultural Arts Division. Her paintings and installations feature characters and narratives that invite empathy while serving as proxies for anxiety and personal desire. Link currently lives and works in Austin. www.alicia-link.com

STEPHANIE CONCEPCION RAMIREZ is a Salvadoran-American artist from Prince George’s County, Maryland. She received her BFA at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, VA and her MFA at the University of Texas at Austin. Her work is based on notions of memory, personal and historical amnesia that trace the veins of the Central American diaspora. In an attempt to reconcile with her personal and cultural histories and memories, she combines images, installations and text that validate truth, false memories, filtered history and fantasy. Ramirez currently works and lives in the Greater Houston area. www.stephaniecramirez.com

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

A Platform is a series of events and art installations organized by Partial Shade and Co-Lab Projects, centered around a physical platform built in an empty lot in East Austin. A Platform will provide a literal and conceptual space for emerging artists to share work and experiences and will provide artists and visitors an opportunity to experiment with new modes of relating to each other and their surroundings.

The structure for A Platform takes the form of a ramp gradually rising to a flat platform 2ft off the ground; this incline makes the platform more accessible to viewers and acts to undermine the established hierarchical relationship between performer and audience. This blurring of boundaries by an unusual, structural site from which to make and view art will encourage all involved to renegotiate their relationship with the physical and social space they are navigating.

PARTIAL SHADE is a nomadic curatorial project focused on organizing visual art exhibitions in non-traditional spaces, with work that is responsive to, considerate of, and affected by its environment. Untethered to one specific piece of real estate, Partial Shade operates as a model for a sustainable, alternative exhibition platform, and offers artists the opportunity to experiment with work that wouldn’t otherwise fit comfortably in a conventional gallery space. Partial Shade is organized by Rachael Starbuck, Michael Muelhaupt, and Jesse Cline. www.partialshade.info


This exhibition is sponsored in part by the Texas Commission on the Arts.

View Event →
May
4
to May 25

"M*A*S*H" : Alexis Mabry and Steef Crombach

  • Co-Lab Projects @ Springdale General (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
IMG_4946 copy.JPG

M*A*S*H
Alexis Mabry and Steef Crombach
May 4th - 25th, 2019

Opening Reception: Saturday, May 4th, 7-11pm
Open Hours: Tuesday-Saturday, 12-6pm

Co-Lab Projects presents M*A*S*H, featuring the collaborative work of Alexis Mabry and Steef Crombach. Alexis and Steef have a strong sensibility towards the “do it yourself” practice of traditional women’s crafts and techniques. Their unique approach towards soft sculpture, found fabric, quilt and tapestry elements, unscrews the existing perception of these traditionally “crafty” media. Through mimesis the work questions themes of gender positioning, colloquialisms, and visual expression of popular culture. The MASH between Steef’s delicate and methodical process and Alexis’s organized chaos, bring their kindred works into new engrossing dimensions.

Alexis E. Mabry (b. 1985) grew up in up in Dallas, Texas. Mabry moved back to Texas after studying at the University of the Arts in Philadelphia  (2011) and Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond (2013). She is a 2019 candidate for her B.F.A from Texas State University this year. Alexis explores social stereotypes in identity through observation, anecdote, and personal introspection. Finding the idea of a person more compelling when it lives in the popular imagination, with a tenuous connection to lived reality. Her work pulls from both personal experiences here and those imagined identities. Being a female BMX rider, she explores feminine roles in male-dominated activities. The work draws from the languages of painting, soft sculpture, and craft. Mabry has shown in solo and group shows regionally throughout in Texas, Richmond, California, and Kentucky.

Steef Crombach (b. 1992) was raised in Maastricht in the South of the Netherlands. She lives and works in Austin as an artist, curator, and teacher at The Contemporary Art School at Laguna Gloria. Crombach earned her B.F.A from the Royal Academy of the Arts in The Hague in 2014. Crombach has a very speculative approach to the world and her direct environment, it’s patterns, objects, colloquialisms, and concrete manifestations. She seeks out and unscrews aspects of our present time that will eventually become part of our collective memory. She is currently investigating the universal interpretation of the themes in her work by changing the environment, and the culture, she and her work belong to. She has been visiting Austin for extended periods of time to curate, exhibit, and research since 2014 and has recently relocated to Austin permanently. In 2017, Crombach organized and curated the nine-artist exhibition Expedition Batikback at Co-Lab Projects. Her work Piet is on exhibition at the Royal Palace in Amsterdam and she is a recipient of the Emerging Artist grant from Mondriaan Fund.

View Event →
“Lossy Process” : Sean Ripple
Apr
6
to Apr 27

“Lossy Process” : Sean Ripple

  • Co-Lab Projects @ Springdale General (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
lossy process web.jpg

Lossy Process
Sean Ripple
April 6th - 27th, 2019

Opening Reception: Saturday, April 6th, 7-11pm
Performances during Fusebox Festival: April 17th, 18th, 19th, and 20th, 2-2:30pm
Open Hours: Tuesday-Saturday, 12-6pm

Read On Sean Ripple’s Lossy Process an essay by Anna Gallagher-Ross

Lossy Process is an exhibition that features approximately two hundred six-second video collages that have been created over the course of three years using mobile app video editing suites. These video collages, which were originally created to be streamed on social media sites, will undergo a transcoding of sorts in IRL viewing space through a simple act of recontextualization. In addition to the collages, there will be a number of recently completed video essays by the artist and a series of performances that are intended to function like advertising for the video content on display.

Sean Ripple is an artist, writer, and curator based in Austin, TX. His projects are often improvisational and interventionist in nature and rely heavily on social media and the Internet to frame the outcomes of a feverish dedication to an idea. Recent projects have explored a perceived lack of commitment to interactivity and participation across a number of digital platforms as well as the destabilization of meaning that seems to trail technological innovation and advancement. His work has been featured in regional publications including …might be good, Glasstire, Austin American Statesman, and Conflict of Interest.

View Event →
"Grounded in Culver" : Anika Cartterfield
Mar
30
to Apr 29

"Grounded in Culver" : Anika Cartterfield

  • Co-Lab Projects @ Glissman Road (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
PS - Grounded in Culver copy.jpg

Partial Shade and Co-Lab Projects present:
Grounded In Culver
Anika Cartterfield
March 30th - May 4th, 2019

In the work Grounded in Culver, Anika Cartterfield creates a space on Partial Shade’s Platform that expands and contorts the original structure. As viewers, we are invited to engage with the screened architectural space, entering the “indoors” to better observe the outdoors. The circular motion through the work does not offer a culminating moment, but instead focuses us on a series of changing viewpoints organized by the space. In this shifting visual and physical experience we are encouraged to consider more than what we are looking at, to reflect on how we see, how we connect and make meaning of separate and contrasting views. Using the barrier of screen, Cartterfield asks: how do we make meaning across contrasting visual, auditory, and physical information? How does this process relate to methods of understanding “other,” specifically the western construct of wild, both in terms of its natural and social constructs? How do our own biases shape this process, succeeding and falling short of genuine seeing?

Anika Cartterfield is a sculptor, experience-based researcher, and conservation activist. Her process begins with understanding the specifics of her site; she investigates the hard and soft history of a place, drawing from geology, archeology, and sociology. She then translates this content into work that articulates how the culture and landscape of the space interact. Her current work explores Texas’ culture and policy around land ownership and how such constructs relate to the human longing for wild. Cartterfield has created site-specific installations in the US and abroad and exhibited in galleries in Vermont, Boston, Maryland, and Austin. She completed her B.F.A. at the Massachusetts College of Art and Design ‘15. She was the 2015 recipient of the prestigious Godine Travel Award to support a two-month material research trip in Mexico. She has participated in residencies at Salem Art Works in NY, Monson Arts Center and Haystack School of Craft and Design in ME, and Arquetopia in Puebla MX. Cartterfield has worked extensively as a leader in conservation nonprofits and as a resident coordinator at Salem Art Works. She is currently making work in Austin TX as an MFA candidate at University of Texas at Austin. www.anikatodd.com


This exhibition is sponsored in part by the Texas Commission on the Arts.

View Event →
"Soft Opening" featuring Adrien Sun Hall, Erica Nix, Peter Clough, and Virginia Lee Montgomery
Mar
10
6:00 PM18:00

"Soft Opening" featuring Adrien Sun Hall, Erica Nix, Peter Clough, and Virginia Lee Montgomery

PS - Soft Opening Newsletter Header-01.jpg

Partial Shade and Co-Lab Projects present:
Soft Opening
Featuring Adrien Sun Hall, Erica Nix, Peter Clough, and Virginia Lee Montgomery
A one-night event and the inaugural exhibition for A Platform, a series of sensitive and site-responsive programming

Event: Sunday, March 10th, 2019, 6-10pm

Soft Opening features four works, all directly positing an idiosyncratic relationship to the environments in which they were created. Made in a field in rural Vermont, inside of a closet in a Brooklyn apartment, in a fitness studio in Austin or directly on a platform, the works deftly navigate these different sites while gesturing towards alternative relationships between bodies and objects. Their temporary convergence outdoors amplify one another, presenting intimate actions here at full volume; out of which a newly synthesized and fluid space is described. Mimicking the verdant landscape with perforated cloth, finding comfort and control in the confinement of a dog cage, animating the inanimate by bathing a stone, inviting an audience to participate in a private moment—the artists in Soft Opening invoke inversions and contradictions to upend expectations of how a body negotiates space.  

A Platform is a series of events and art installations organized by Partial Shade and Co-Lab Projects, centered around a physical platform built in an empty lot in East Austin. A Platform will provide a literal and conceptual space for emerging artists to share work and experiences and will provide artists and visitors an opportunity to experiment with new modes of relating to each other and their surroundings.

The structure for A Platform takes the form of a ramp gradually rising to a flat platform 2ft off the ground; this incline makes the platform more accessible to viewers and acts to undermine the established hierarchical relationship between performer and audience. This blurring of boundaries by an unusual, structural site from which to make and view art will encourage all involved to renegotiate their relationship with the physical and social space they are navigating.

PARTIAL SHADE is a nomadic curatorial project focused on organizing visual art exhibitions in non-traditional spaces, with work that is responsive to, considerate of, and affected by its environment. Untethered to one specific piece of real estate, Partial Shade operates as a model for a sustainable, alternative exhibition platform, and offers artists the opportunity to experiment with work that wouldn’t otherwise fit comfortably in a conventional gallery space. Partial Shade is organized by Rachael Starbuck, Michael Muelhaupt, and Jesse Cline.

ADRIEN SUN HALL works through sculpture, performance, and time-based media to investigate acts of passing between different identities and spaces. Hall’s current work borrows from theatrical and militaristic strategies for the manipulation of visibility and display to pose questions of spectatorship and performer-audience agency. Hall holds a BLA in Landscape Architecture from the University of Guelph and an MFA in Visual Art from the University of Pennsylvania. Hall has exhibited and performed at such venues as Vox Populi, Fjord Gallery, and Icebox Project Space in Philadelphia, and David Nolan Gallery in New York. Hall was a resident artist at the Vermont Studio Center and co-curator of A/PUBLIC at the Kelly Writers House. www.adriennehall.ca

ERICA NIX is a certified personal trainer, body-positive ambassador, and owner of Transform, a queer-centric fitness center in Austin, Texas. On a mission to "Make Working Out Fun Again!" by bringing dance aerobics into public spaces and creating space for queers and weirdos, Nix’s performances and videos combine kitschy, sex-positive choreography from a variety of vintage sources to produce a refreshing mix of nostalgic aerobics, raunch, and pop-culture. Nix’s performance art and work as a queer and trans-inclusive, body-positive activist and personal trainer is well-documented: active participation in LGBTQIA activist rallies and demonstrations; being a regularly featured artist at OUTsider Fest, aGLIFF, the Museum of Human Achievement, and MASS Gallery; awarded an Austin Critics Table Award in 2016 for Best Independent Project and Austin Chronicle’s Best Body Positive Ambassador in 2016 and Best Personal Trainer Award in 2017 and 2018.  www.workoutwithericanix.com

PETER CLOUGH is an artist, activist, and curator, working across media to explore queer sexuality and fetish through humor and childhood wonder. Clough's work is insistently vulnerable, celebrating personal narrative as a political tool and queer strategy. Clough’s work is rooted in collage, cutting and manipulating images of his own body to create works that exist on the borders of desire and repulsion, sexiness and silliness, pleasure and suffering. Clough was born in Boston in 1984 and received a BA from Grinnell College in 2006 and an MFA from NYU Steinhardt in 2009. Clough has presented work in New York at MoMA PS1, Printed Matter, Fresh Window Gallery, Microscope Gallery, Southfirst Gallery, Wayfarers Gallery, LeRoy Neiman Gallery, SPRING/BREAK Art Fair, the Center for Performance Research, and Dixon Place Theater, in Pittsburg at the Andy Warhol Museum, in L.A. at Human Resources, in Nashville at Open Lot, in Berlin at Peres Projects and Space/Time at FLUTGRABEN e.V., in Seoul at Konkuk University and The House of Collections, in Antwerp at the Monty, in Ghent at Off/off Cinema and in Oslo at Kunstnernes Hus, Fotogalleriet, and SOPPEN Performance Festival at Ekebergparken. Clough’s work has been featured in the New York Times and Time Out magazine. Clough lives and works in Brooklyn. www.peterclough.net

VIRGINIA LEE MONTGOMERY (b. 1986, Houston) received her BFA from The University of Texas at Austin in 2008 and MFA from Yale University in Sculpture in 2016. She is a hybrid artist and works primarily with video, performance, sound, and sculpture. Her artwork is a practice of metaphysics, latently autobiographical, and often with a feminist impulse. The work is paradoxically cryptic and literal, conceptual and hand-built. Her movements interrogate the relationship between physical and psychic structures. VLM also works as a professional mind-map scribe, a Graphic Facilitator.  www.virginialeemontgomery.com

View Event →
"Lines Composed During A Tour" featuring Sara Vanderbeek, Andy Coolquitt, Kristi Kongi, and Erin Curtis
Mar
9
to Mar 30

"Lines Composed During A Tour" featuring Sara Vanderbeek, Andy Coolquitt, Kristi Kongi, and Erin Curtis

  • Co-Lab Projects @ Springdale General (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
JungleSunset.jpg

Co-Lab Projects Presents:

Lines Composed During A Tour
Featuring Sara Vanderbeek, Andy Coolquitt, Kristi Kongi, and Erin Curtis
Curated by Leslie Moody Castro and Sean Gaulager
March 9th - 30th, 2019

Open Hours: Tuesday-Saturday, 12-6pm

Culled from a few of our favorite recent exhibitions, this selection of work focuses on materials, movement, pattern, color, and light. Each of these artists employ very different techniques, often utilizing textiles, iconography, flora, found objects, “sloppy” geometry and fabrication; but all elicit reverential humor for the commonplace and the banal objects of everyday life. Their use of color and pattern unify their collective voices while offering entry points into their individual practices. While each of the four artists pull references from a variety of sources, histories, and contexts the formal qualities of the works offer moments of connectivity and reciprocity, engaging in playful dialog with one another and the exhibition space itself.

Sara Vanderbeek is a Texas-based multi-disciplinary visual artist who creates concept-driven series focused on reframing the window and vernacular of portraiture. Her brightly colored work contextualizes autobiographical experiences, appropriates visual imagery and responds to culture and politics. Her artwork has been included in several solo and group shows nationally, including the McNay Art Museum, Art Palace, The Contemporary Austin, grayDUCK Gallery, Freight Gallery, Deitch Projects, Co-Lab Projects and was included in the 2013 Texas Biennial at Blue Star Contemporary. In addition to her studio practice, she works as an independent art consultant and Director of DORF, an alternative gallery space in Austin.  She received her BFA from Rhode Island School of Design in 2003.

Andy Coolquitt was born in Texas in 1964 and currently lives in Austin. He recently opened a solo exhibition titled “Andy Coolquitt: i need a hole in my head” at the Museum of Contemporary Art Santa Barbara, in California. Coolquitt is perhaps most widely known for a house, a performance/studio/domestic space that began as his master's thesis project at the University of Texas at Austin in 1994, and continues to the present day. He has been an artist-in-residence at Artpace, San Antonio, TX; Chinati Foundation, Marfa, TX; and 21er Haus, Vienna, Austria. Recent exhibitions include the Tang Museum in Saratoga Springs, NY; The Contemporary Austin, Texas; The Museum of Contemporary Art Denver, Colorado; Rodeo Gallery, Istanbul, Turkey; and The Goethe Institute - Ludlow 38, New York. His work is included in the collections of the Philbrook Museum of Art, Tulsa, Oklahoma; the Österreichische Galerie Belvedere, Vienna, Austria; the Henry Art Gallery at the University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; and the Frances Young Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery at Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, New York.

Kristi Kongi (Tallinn, Estonia; 1985) is a visual artist whose paintings and site specific installations focus on the nuances of light and its effect on color. Her works use color to build and preserve narratives, memories and histories while offering a different perspective and point of view. Kristi studied painting at Tartu Art College (BA, 2004-2008) and graduated from Estonian Academy of Arts painting department (MA, 2008-2011). She’s been awarded with Young Artist Prize (2011), Sadolin Art Prize (2013) and was nominated for Köler Prize in 2016. Kongi was awarded with Konrad Mägi Prize in 2017. She is Associate Professor at the Estonian Academy of Arts painting department.

Erin Curtis is an artist living and working in Austin, Texas. Her recent work reflects an interest in geometric abstraction and its historical roots in weaving, architecture, nature and ritual. Curtis’s work combines utopic ideals of beauty and structure, with process and chance. Primarily working as a painter, she also creates, large-scale, site-specific installations and public art projects. She has received grants from the Dallas Museum of Art, the Andy Warhol Foundation, the City of Austin and the District of Columbia. Recently, Curtis had solo shows at Conduit Gallery, Dallas, TX (2017), CalPoly San Luis Obispo University, California (2016), Big Medium Gallery in Austin, Texas (2015) and at Flashpoint Gallery (2015) in Washington, DC. She has created commissioned works for the Chicago Transit Authority, City of Washington DC, Facebook, Art in Embassies and The City of Austin. Curtis attended the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in 2010 and was awarded fully funded residencies at Anderson Ranch (2012) and Vermont Studio Center (2014). In 2008-2009, Curtis was a Fulbright Scholar in Jaipur, Rajasthan. Curtis graduated from Williams College with a BA in Liberal Arts in 1999 and received her MFA from the University of Texas at Austin in 2007.

View Event →